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Shea Butter – Whip it Good

Whip It

Shea butter, it’s edible, you’ve probably eaten it before in chocolate. Mmmm – fat derived from the Shea tree nut, coming from Africa – even Cleopatra used it in her cosmetics… and who knows what else. If it was good enough for Cleo, then it’s good enough for me!

Shea butter is a triglyceride, high in the saturated fatty acid stearic acid – it acts as a softening agent. It also contains oleic acid, a monounsaturated omega-9 fatty acid, which is an emollient that improves skin hydration by reducing evaporation.

If you have skin issues, why not go for one of the best natural choices available? Just whip up some raw 100% pure Shea butter and add your own favourite scented oils!

Scented Whipped Shea Butter
1/2 cup Raw 100% Shea Butter
1 tbsp coconut oil
8 drops Lemongrass Oil
8 drops Rosemary Oil

Whip it Good, on high for 5 – 10 minutes

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Store your whipped Shea butter in opaque glass jars if possible. Light and oxygen exposure will reduce nutrient loss, so keep that in mind when storing your foods too. I used a mini-mason jar so I can bring it along to work, and I’m using this tinted brown recycled yeast container for at home. Happy Whipping!

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Pottery by Eve Yantha

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Oven Canning Jar Crumble

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Lovely pottery by the multi-talented Eve Yantha

Whenever I think of crumble, I get Adele stuck in my head, “Let the skyfall… apple crumble…

These canning jar crumbles were so incredibly easy and turned out positively delish! I’ll be sure to bring one along with me to school as a tasty sidekick to one of my healthy mason jar salads!

After coming across a bake cakes in a jar video, I decided to try a somewhat healthier version substituting some of the white flour with whole wheat, and the white sugar for brown. Then for the heck of it, because that’s how I roll, I threw in some oats.  This switched my experiment from a cake to a crumble,

wpid-20150208_113147.jpgOf course, mason jars are built to withstand up to 250 °F, and they are meant for contact water baths, not dry heat like in an oven, so there is a possibility of glass cracking. In fact, canning jar manufacturers do not recommend using dry heat methods, saying they were not intended or approved for that purpose. Baking in mason jars is a fun trend right now, but please use caution and check carefully for cracks before consuming – shards of glass are not something you want in your fabulous desserts!

 

Here’s all you need:

4 1/2 pint jars
oven safe dish
dried beans (to stop jars from sliding)

2.5 cups of fruit
1/4 cup whole wheat flour
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup rolled oats
1/2 tsp salt
4 tbsp unsalted butter

Preheat oven to 350 °F.
Divide the fruit up between your jars, (I only had 1 pint jars so filled them only half full).
Combine the flours,  sugar, oats, and salt in a bowl, then divide evenly between jars.
Lay a clump of butter on top, and place jars in an oven dish, spreading dried beans around jars to hold them in place. Bake for 1 hour, cool completely.
They can be stored in the fridge for up to one week.

Nutrients Per Serving

kcalories
Fat
Cholesterol
Sodium
Potassium
Sugar
Protein
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
Calcium
322.2
12.7  gr.
30.5 mg.
303 mg.
247 mg.
34 gr.
4 gr.
98 RAE
48 mg.
47 mg.

Uber Healthy Lunch

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Anthropology of Food class

Julia Mirabella has a new recipe book out called Mason Jar Salads which is definitely worth the buy; it inspired me to grab a mason jar and create one on the spot using my fridge ingredients.

According to the book, if you pack these salads in the right order and tightly into the mason jar, you can refrigerate five on a Sunday and the last one will still be fresh by Friday! Great idea, and so healthy. This salad left me filled right up for the day, and I was pleasantly amazed at how well beans, green leaves, and grains can compliment each other in a salad.

Black beans were soaking in apple cider honey vinaigrette at the bottom of the jar, and from there you can see some finely chopped jalapeno above carrots and tomato. I mixed a few craisins in with the spinach and topped the jar with some of my kitchen-grown radish sprouts, and a bunch of feta cheese mmmmm. I had to restrain myself from throwing sunflower seeds and chopped apples in — you just have to stop somewhere!

The recipes in the book are really delish looking. My grocery list is ready to go, so next week I’ll be flashing around some more uberhealthy lunches hehe.

So, hey, if even my superfit nutrition teacher bothered to scribble the book’s title down after seeing it, you know it’s gotta be good!

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